History

The story of Miriam College dates back to 1926 when the Archbishop of Manila, then Reverend Michael O’ Doherty, requested the Sisters of the Maryknoll Congregation in New York to initiate a teacher-training program for women in the Philippines. In an old remodeled Augustinian Convent in Malabon, Rizal, the Malabon Normal School was established. The school transferred sites several times until finally in 1953, with its name officially changed to Maryknoll College, it laid down its permanent roots in Diliman (or Loyola Heights), Quezon City.

Its graduates have distinguished themselves in various professions. Several have been cabinet secretaries, legislators, accomplished businesswomen, entrepreneurs, educators and leaders of government and nongovernmental organizations. To date, nineteen alumnae have been selected as “The Outstanding Women in the Nation’s Service” (TOWNS) awardees.

After Vatican II, the Maryknoll congregation began to evaluate its work, not only in the Philippines but worldwide, in the light of their original apostolate as a missionary order. In the 60s, the Maryknoll congregation saw the readiness of the Filipino laity to continue the educational mission they had started. In 1977, the ownership and management of the school were turned over to lay administrators. In accordance with the agreement, the name Maryknoll was to be changed to pave the way for the promotion of the school’s unique identity, distinct although not disconnected from the identity of the Maryknoll sisters. In 1989, after a series of consultations, Maryknoll College was re-named Miriam College.