Miriam College and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) recently signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to officially seal their partnership as Philippine hosts to the 6th UNESCO-APEID meeting on Entrepreneurship Education 2017.   This meeting brings together selected participants from the ASEAN, East, South Asia, and the Pacific Region to create a common framework for entrepreneurship curricula and programs in the region. This goal hopes to multiply opportunities for harmonizing entrepreneurship education that is aligned with national goals as well as empower the citizens of ASEAN and other Asia Pacific countries to respond to global demands.

Signing the MOA were (in photo, center) CHED Chairperson Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan and Miriam College (MC) Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Maria Lourdes Q. Baybay witnessed by (from left) the Director for International Affairs Staff Atty. Lily Freida Milla, MC College of Business, Entrepreneurship, and Accountancy (CBEA) Graduate Programs coordinator and ENEDA National President Dr. Elaine L. Boquiren, One Meralco Foundation OIC and event sponsor Neil Celeste Rara,  MC-CBEA Dean and current Country Program Chair for the 6th UNESCO APEID Dr. Antonio M. Lopez.

The signing was held at the Commission on Higher Education main office in Diliman.

The 6th UNESCO-APEID Meeting on Entrepreneurship Education carries the theme “Designing a Relevant and Innovative Entrepreneurship Education: Towards Mutual Recognition of Qualification in ASEAN, East and South Asia.”

It will be held on October 23-25, 2017 at the Marco Polo Hotel in Ortigas on the first two days and at the Miriam College-Henry Sy, Sr. Innovation Center on the third and last day.

On Oct. 6, the Nobel Committee announced that it had awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2017 to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a coalition of nongovernment organizations in 100 countries, in recognition of its role in achieving the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons that was adopted by 122 states on July 7.

In its response to the announcement, the ICAN acknowledged that the treaty is a historic agreement that “offers a powerful, much-needed alternative to a world in which threats of mass destruction are allowed to prevail and, indeed, are escalating.”

Nuclear weapons are the most destructive weapons ever created, and they threaten the very survival of humanity and our Earth. Hence, the elimination of nuclear weapons has been the goal of ICAN from the time the network was established. After the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, ICAN paid tribute to all those who have supported the treaty, particularly the campaigners all over the world, the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or the hibakusha, the victims of nuclear test explosions worldwide, and the states that have signed and ratified the treaty.

It should be a source of pride that the Philippines is one of the first 50 countries to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which was opened for signature last Sept. 20 (United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs). Long before the negotiations on the treaty, our delegation had constantly expressed the Philippines’ strong stand on the abolition of nuclear weapons. In 2015, the Philippine government reiterated this position in a statement at the UN: “We will continue to state the strong case for the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and tirelessly call for the start of a process … that will fill the legal gap for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons.”

It can thus be said that the Philippines has taken a leadership role on the matter even prior to the treaty negotiations. The Philippines has the distinction of being the first Asean country to endorse the “Humanitarian Pledge.” It was also among the first few countries that collectively issued a working paper at the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that highlighted the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of using nuclear weapons. The working paper also cited the need for effective measures toward a legal framework that would ban nuclear weapons.

The “Humanitarian Pledge” reflected a fundamental shift in the international discourse on nuclear disarmament — moving away from a deterrence paradigm and toward one that looks at the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and the demands of true human and planetary security. In 2015, increasing international support for this pledge indicated that many governments were ready to move forward on the issue of prohibiting nuclear weapons, even if the nuclear-weapon states were not ready to join.

The Philippines’ consistent support for the cause culminated in its “yes” vote for the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons last July. It is hoped that the Philippines will continue to take the lead in this matter by ratifying the treaty soon.

* * *

Loreta Navarro-Castro is the program director of the Center for Peace Education, and a professor of international studies and education at Miriam College.


Published at the Philippine Daily Inquirer > opinion.inquirer.net/107823/ph-treaty-banning-nuclear-weapons#ixzz4vLV4qzp0



The Asia-Pacific Network for International Education and Values Education (APNIEVE) will hold its 16th National Convention in partnership with the University of Northern Philippines in Vigan City, Ilocos Sur on April 26, 27 and 28, 2017. Keynote speaker is Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan, chairperson of the Commission on Higher Education. The convention theme this year is "In Pursuit of Quality Education, the Past, Present, and Future." Conference strands will revolve around the leading-edge thinking about the quality of education; innovative approaches, and practices that improve the quality of education; the assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of the quality of education; and the gaps where more research and efforts are needed to achieve inclusive and quality education by 2030.

Founded in 1995 by Dr. Lourdes R. Quisumbing, UNESCO-APNIEVE aims to promote and develop international education and values education for peace, human rights, democracy, and sustainable development through networking and cooperation among individuals and institutions in the Asia Pacific region. APNIEVE Philippines's current president is Dr. Maria Lourdes Quisumbing-Baybay, vice president for academic affairs of Miriam College.

The annual convention of APNIEVE Philippines gathers teachers and administrators from various colleges and universities from the different regions of the country. For interested participants, you may contact Angelina Bayaua Alcazar at 4354754.


SOURCES: Philippine Daily Inquirer and Business Mirror (published in print on March 27, 2017)

Sisters—perennials, millennials, or mere buds—are invited to take part in tomorrow’s observance of International Women’s Day.
In particular, there will be a forum on “Women and Democracy” to be held at the Little Theater, Miriam College on Katipunan Avenue, Quezon City, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

A special guest at the forum is Vice President Leni Robredo, and she will be joined by Sen. Risa Hontiveros and Sen. Leila de Lima, the last perhaps digitally. The renowned and much-missed duo Inang Laya will lend their artistry to the event. A “public conversation” with all the women present and guests will then follow.

Why should Filipino women be talking of democracy? Well, now more than ever! There is no better time, no more urgent a topic than the threats to democracy presented in these days of EJKs, “tokhang” and creeping authoritarianism, as exemplified by the arrest and detention of De Lima.  If, with the exception of a few hardy champions, our legislators and officials choose to hide behind political expediency and cowardly accommodation, then Filipino women will have to take up the slack. After all, we have long been on the frontline of the battle to establish and then restore democracy on our shores, and I believe we will not shirk our duty and our mission this time around.

Celebrate International Women’s Day, tomorrow at Miriam College, and for the rest of Women’s Month in the streets, in our classrooms, in our homes. The fight continues and grows more urgent with each passing day.

Another “arena” in our battle for our rights and autonomy as women hews closer to home, in our own bodies, in fact, in each woman’s uterus, vagina, and, most important, mind and will.

Women’s groups, reproductive health advocates and even government bodies like the Department of Health and the Population Commission, have issued an urgent message directed at the Supreme Court to lift, as soon as possible, a temporary restraining order blocking the full implementation of the Reproductive Health Law.
Acting on the petition of RH opponents, the Supreme Court in 2015 issued an order preventing the DOH from distributing contraceptive implants, on grounds that these might cause abortions (a fear that has been scientifically disproved).

At the same time, the tribunal also ordered the Food and Drug Administration to go through the entire cycle of certification for ALL family planning devices and supplies, including those that have long been in use but whose licenses will soon expire.

If the TRO lasts much longer, Filipino women will soon lose all access to most forms of contraception. What this means is that our access to life-saving forms of contraception will be curtailed. Already, we are seeing an uptick not just in the number of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, but also in maternal and infant deaths.

This is why the PopCom considers the situation created by the TRO on contraceptives as a looming “public health emergency.” This is because, unless conditions change drastically, the PopCom estimates that the number of mothers dying during childbirth “may also rise by an additional 1,000 deaths a year during the next six years.”

Some people, especially the self-righteous and narrow-minded, may not consider an additional 1,000 mothers dying every year a public health crisis. (Perhaps they’re the same folks who can accept with equanimity over 7,000 EJKs in less than a year?) But I certainly do!

In addition, the PopCom sees the total Philippine population rising to more than 113 million by 2022, from its current total of 104 million. The explosion in the number of new births can be traced in part to the lack of access of women—especially younger women—to contraception. Not only would mistimed pregnancy take a toll on the health of younger (and older) mothers, it would also have adverse effects on the health and chances of survival of newborns and of their surviving siblings as well.
The PopCom in a press release says the lifting of the TRO would be a “gift of health” to Filipino women. It would also be an acknowledgment of the inherent right of women (and men) to reproductive health and to choose the life they want for themselves.


SOURCE: Philippine Daily Inquirer > http://opinion.inquirer.net/102234/women-democracy-bodies#ixzz4abJQoj6O 

The Middle School kicked off their celebration of the National Arts Month through an exhibit at the Our lady of Peace Lobby last February 1, 2017. The Dance Club creatively led the unveiling with a dance interpretation. Carrying the theme “Art Feast”, the event showcased not only the students’ art work but also several dishes guised as art activities.

Long buffet tables laid were laid out in the Calachuchi Garden where students held their Entrep Art from February 1 to 2.  Grade 8 students, with the able guidance of their HELE teachers, experienced how it is to be entrepreneurs as they sold maki and decorative cupcakes.  The Cartoonists club, with the help of their club moderators, offered printing services, while Tiny Path sold art supplies. The students experienced what it’s like to be entrepreneurs first hand as they prepared, marketed, and sold their products.  They also learned simple accounting, doing the inventory and computation of their profits or losses.  The activity taught them how to run a business and at the same time how to use art could be used to attract more clients.

Another activity featured was the interaction between the MCMS students and the MC HEU Applied Arts students last February 2, 2017. College students from the Department of Humanities and Applied Arts taught MS students basic drawing techniques, calligraphy, animation, and photography.

Several contests such as the PICS Perfect Photography contest for Grade 6 (February 16), On-the-Spot Art for the Grade 7 (February 17) and the Eight Asian Treasures (February 28) were also held, capping the MS National Arts Month celebration.

To show their love on Valentine's day, Pax Christi of the Higher Education Unit, the Year Councils and the Sanggunian ng mga Mag-aaral ng Miriam organized the Lugawan Para Sa Mindanao as part of the institution's celebration of the Mindanao Month of Peace.

The Lugawan aimed to raise students' awareness of peace and conflict issues that confront Mindanao. It also aimed to raise funds to support the Twinning Project between MC and Rajah Muda National High School in Pikit, Cotabato and other Mindanao related causes.

The Miriam College-Henry Sy, Sr. Innovation Center (HSSIC) hosted its first public lecture titled ‘The Future of Creativity’, featuring Prof. Mark d’Inverno of Goldsmiths, University of London last February 23 at Miriam College.

Prof. d’Inverno is currently the Pro-warden International at Goldsmiths. He has taught computer science at the same university for 10 years and has led large research projects covering artificial intelligence, art, music, and education.

Creative activity

His lecture proposed a workable definition of “creative activity” to replace “creativity” which he says is a widely and over-used term that has come to mean a little more than that we approve of. His definition is based on current innovations in research and teaching at Goldsmiths and focused on the creative process and pedagogies used for teaching creative practice.

D’Inverno asserts that creative activity is not about novelty nor measuring human power but is something open to us and about a being in the world. “It is a vigor and openness to the world around you. It is engaging yourself and losing yourself in what you’re doing. Sometimes I play the piano and I don’t really know where I am.” D’Inverno is also a critically acclaimed jazz pianist in the UK.

He emphasized that at the heart of teaching creative activity is the need to take and receive feedback about one’s work. “I think that is a critical part of what you want to be. Taking feedback is a difficult, important journey. It is a key to learning.”

As important as getting feedback is giving feedback. “Giving feedback is also a creative act. [Through it] we understand the relationship between intention and perception,” he says.  Among other topics, D’Inverno also touched on using Artificial Intelligence to support human creativity. 
In the audience were Miriam College President Dr. Rosario O. Lapus, representatives from the Commission on Higher Education and the British Council, undergraduate and graduate students, and teachers of design-related fields.

Prof. d’Inverno is the first DREAMS specialist to give a lecture at HSSIC. DREAMS stands for the areas of specialization of the Innovation Center – Design, Robotics, Engineering and Entrepreneurship, Arts, Mathematics, and Social responsibility.

“His talk contributes to the strategic direction of the center which is to become a space where creativity, innovation, and alternative thinking are constantly revisited from both the theoretical and practical vantage points. In so doing, learners, teachers, and industry practitioners are equipped with updated knowledge and skills in the three areas mentioned,” says Dr. Edizon Fermin, Miriam College’s director for Innovation Development.

Partnership in design education

The lecture is in partnership with the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), British Council, and Goldsmiths, University of London.  It is part of the ongoing RP-UK Transnational Education (TNE) Links Programme connected to the K to 12 Transition Program of the CHED, under the Institutional Development and Innovation Grants Scheme.

The visit of Prof d’Inverno and the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between Miriam College and Goldsmiths heralds the formalization of the partnership between the two institutions for the development of a niche graduate degree program in design education.

Goldsmiths is one of the world’s leading institutions for Arts and Humanities in the UK and has a rich heritage of producing alumni that have had a huge impact on the "creative industries," winning Oscars, Turner prizes, Ivor Novello awards, Olivier awards and Mercury awards. Its roster of alumni include fashion designer Mary Quant and Vivienne Westwood, filmmaker Steve McQueen, sculptor Sir Antony Mark David Gormley, composer Adrian Sutton, and artist Damien Hirst.


Miriam College recently turned over the Asian University Digital Resource Network (AUDRN) secretariat to Silliman University after hosting the network for the past four years.  Dr. Dave Marcial, dean of the College of Computer Studies in Silliman University, is the network’s new executive director.
 
The 4th Board of Directors (BOD) meetings held on February 16, 2017 signaled this transition under the leadership of the president of Silliman University and 2nd AUDRN president, Dr. Ben Malayang III. The meeting was attended by eight presidents and representatives of the network's BOD, namely: Dr. Rosario O. Lapus (President, Miriam College), Dr. Joseph Emmanuel Angeles (President, Angeles University Foundation), Bro. Manuel Pajarillo, FSC (President and Chancellor, University of St. La Salle), Dr. Darren Datilles (Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Notre Dame of Jolo College), Fr. Randy Odchigue (Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Fr. Saturnino Urios University), Fr. Richard Ang, OP (Vice-Rector, UST) and Fr. Jay Miranda, OP (Secretary General, University of Santo Tomas). 
 
Dr. Malou Baybay, Miriam College Vice President for Academic Affairs and former AUDRN executive director, presented the network's accomplishment report for school year 2015-2016 as her final official function to the network. She now serves as the official coordinator of Miriam College to the network. The board discussed several innovative proposals which include the possible creation and offering of a graduate program (master and doctorate levels) on local knowledge and educational digital technology through a consortium of the network's partner schools. The board of directors approved and passed a resolution of gratitude and commendation to Dr. Lapus as AUDRN's first president and Dr. Baybay and Sheila Lo Dingcong as secretariat for their full support to the local knowledge initiative and hard work in contributing to the development of quality and holistic education in the Philippines and Asia.
 
The AUDRN coordinators' planning was conducted the following day and Miriam College was represented by Sheila Dingcong. Among the major activities of AUDRN for this year are the youth camp, its biennial national convention, and a knowledge exchange conference which will revolve around the theme of building competence, consciousness, and conscience in education.

The Miriam College Museum (MCM)/Gallery of Women’s Art (GAWA), in celebration of the National Arts Month, mounted an art installation exhibit entitled “INSTALL-AKSYON:” Art Installation Exhibit on Women Empowerment, Environment, Peace and other Social Issues, last February 17, 2017 at the SMT and PA Grounds.

The said exhibit is a showcase of the works of social action oriented groups of award winning contemporary artists in the country: Sam Penaso, Arnel Garcia, Long Melo, Boyet De Mesa, Herminigildo Pineda, Don De Dios, Maestro Mael De Guzman, Patrick Chong, Ed Gutierrez, Isidro “Manong Jon” Santos and Vim Nadera.

Present at the inauguration were Dr. Maria Lourdes Q. Baybay, Miriam College Vice President for Academic Affairs representing the general administration, Dr. Francis Julius Evangelista, OIC Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Joseph Richard C. Renta, MC Museum and GAWA curator, faculty members, staff and students of the Higher Education Unit.

It is the aim of the MC Museum/GAWA to expose students to a visual art experience and interaction with the artwork and the artists.  The exhibit will run until March 10, 2017.


Last February 15, Pax Christi-MCHS members together with members of SilPeace, the interfaith youth organization of Silsilah from Quiapo, participated in a meaningful interaction session to learn about youth peacebuilding and how our different religious beliefs can bring us together. The student members of SilPeace are from Ramon Avencena High School and Manuel L. Quezon University High School. 
 
The participants discussed practical and realistic solutions to issues such as the growing threat of terrorism, religious intolerance, and discrimination. These solutions include the promotion of dialogue through people to people process especially among young people, and the role of education to address misconceptions. 
 
The session became an eye opener to many of the participants and served as the beginning of more committed work towards a world free from hate and religious intolerance. It was facilitated by Mary Ann Lascano, moderator of MC-HS Pax Christi, Alfrein Quirionez from SilPeace and Mirma Tica-Ortiz, moderator of the Pax Christi-Miriam College.

Pages: Prev1234567...107NextReturn Top



News Archives
 
View All Tags