I am ashamed of many things in my life, but admitting I’ve been suffering from anxiety and depression disorders is not one of them. Not anymore. I used to believe that I was an anomaly, but it took some heavenly spark of optimism from others to make me realize I was not different. There were three people who made it possible for me to live to tell the tale. For confidentiality purposes, their names are masked as Courage, Hope and Strength.

The first is Courage. She has been a friend of mine since our first year in high school and is one of the bravest women I know. Being a new student that year didn’t stop her from expressing herself. I envied that about her. We were both editors at our high school newspaper and I admired her passion for writing and poetry. What drew us closer together was when I found out she was also battling depression. We both saw each other’s demise just from the look in our eyes. When you’ve felt the grip of depression, it’s easy to set apart the sad people from the crowd. It was always the same hollow, lifeless looks, the bowed heads and the aching twitches of their mouths when they tried to smile or keep themselves from crying. Even when I knew she was hurting, she talked to me when I was alone and gave me big bear hugs. She helped set a fire for me so I could see my way back even if it was temporary.

The second is Hope. I’ve known her for many years and she has been a trusted friend but we connect more through social media. We strike conversations on Twitter or Facebook which would last for hours in the middle of the night. She possesses the sincerity and humility of one that effectively brings out the best in people. In a significant time when I almost came to self-harm, I saw that she left more than a few kind words for me on Facebook as a reply to a letter I gave her. She wasn’t a depressive like Courage and me, but she understood. She didn’t exactly know what to say, but just listening was worth any kind of response. Her enthusiasm and curiosity about the world gave me hope like no other.

The third is Strength. She is one of my most cherished friends. Three years of knowing each other already feels like a lifetime. If I were to rank these three, Strength is the first and her presence at a suicide attempt proved that. When I was confined in hospital, she stayed for hours even if she had school the next day. She sent me flowers and get-well-soon cards, but most of all she sent me her love. She has seen me at my best and worst, and yet she’s still here.  She stayed with me and listened to me, never judged me, and never made me feel so alone. It wasn’t just in my utmost time of need. In her little cat-littered home, we’d go as deep as if we were still stardust and as shallow as skimming pebbles on a pond. My family taught me how to open my heart, but she’s the one who made me do so, and that takes a truly one-of-a-kind strength to do..


Read the rest of the story at the Philippine Daily Inquirer Young Blood >> opinion.inquirer.net/77884/kindness-saves

If we survived the stress brought to us by high school exams and especially college entrance tests, college mid-terms should be a piece of cake. However, we shouldn’t take it lightly, in fact, now that we’re in college, we must step up our game. Here are some of the survival tips that I wish to share which will hopefully help my fellow freshmen:

1. Prepare.

If you’re the kind of person that easily gets anxious because exams are coming, here’s the best tip for you. Prepare ahead of time so that it would be easier for you to study for the upcoming tests. Make sure you know all the topics that will be included in your exams so you won’t miss out on anything!

2. Be organized.

This tip is very important and essential not only for those OC people (like me) but for everyone in general. Organize your notes and keep the reviewers you’ve made for the quizzes you’ve had before the exam. This will help you save time and accomplish more.

3. Prioritize.

Know your priorities. Focus on what you have to do first and finish it before you start doing another task. If you start on two tasks at once, it will be less likely for you to finish faster.

4. Manage your time.

The best thing to do is make a schedule and be sure to stick to it. Don’t spend too much time on one thing instead, make sure you allot enough time for each task.

5. Avoid cramming and procrastinating.

Never ever practice these traits. We’re already in college; we must have the initiative to accomplish things. Don’t ever procrastinate because in the end, you’ll cram and if you do, you won’t produce high quality works.

6. Avoid distractions.

Cut-off the sources of distractions like cellphone, tablet, laptop, and especially social media. Like what I said earlier, know your priorities, and these things shouldn’t be on top of your lists. 

7. Take advantage of the consultation hours.

If you cannot understand a thing your prof said during class, don’t hesitate to consult him or her during consultation hours. Every prof allots a specific time for consultation; you just have to ask them about it.

8. Find a study style which best works for you.

Everybody has their own way of studying. If a quiet place works for you, then go for it. On the other hand, if study groups work for you then go find yourself some study buddies. Settle for what is comfortable for you and what will make you focus more on what you’re doing.

9. Take a break.

Don’t stress too much about the upcoming exams. Take a break every now and then to refresh your mind and to regain energy. Yet, don’t take too much breaks that you end up procrastinating.

10. Sleep.

Do not ever sacrifice sleep to study. Everybody needs to sleep. What some people do is that they take a power nap that lasts for about 20 minutes to 1 hour only before starting to study. Pulling up an all-nighter could drain you for the next day which is why it is important that you allot enough time for sleep.


Some of my batch mates from high school shared their own ways on how to prepare for the upcoming exams. Take a look at what they said!

“Get sleep before midterms.” – Gia Cordero (BS ETC)

“Never procrastinate. Set your priorities straight. A teacher once told me that we should already prepare ourselves for exams a week before, so the weekend before the exam we are able to relax and rest.” – Mikyle Ilustre (BSCDE-SPED)

“Before my exams, I ensure that I have notes and I rewrite it to make a reviewer because it helps me to remember the lessons easily. I let myself to focus more; it means no distractions so that I could ace my exams. I also ask for God’s guidance so that He could help me make through the exam week.” – Mariela Fellone (BS BIO)

“What I did back in high school was I’d summarize my notes (with more examples and things like acronyms) and for me it was an effective way of recalling the topic since it becomes fresh to my memory. Another was I’d talk to myself about the topic, medyo weird but it works.” – Selina Almario (BS PSY)

“I study again 15 minutes before the test so that everything sticks!” – Denise Villarino (BA PSY)

“Complete tasks, one by one. Sometimes multi-tasking makes it more complicated.” – Elyse Enciso (BS PSY)


Hopefully, these tips could help you throughout the exam week! Study well and good luck!




Carla Egargo

Carla is a college freshman taking up Psychology in Miriam College. She loves travelling and dancing. She also has the heart for arts and music.

 Would you like to contribute to MC News features?
Email us at externalaffairs [AT] mc [DOT] edu [DOT] ph.

Ana May Dominique De Dios (3rd year BA Communication) did it again! De Dios was among the finisher of the 38th MILO® Manila Leg Eliminations Marathon held last July 27 at the MOA.

De Dios finished 42K in 5:39:30 running time and ranked at 1843 out of 2541. The  gun started at 3:00 a.m. with the starting and ending point at Corner Bayshore Ave.

De Dios has made a mark at the Bataan Death March Ultra-marathon race last March and last June at the Independence Day race.
The MILO® Marathon is the longest-running and most-attended marathon in the Philippines. Since its inception in 1974, more and more people have joined, making it the brand’s biggest and grandest sports event.  – Patti Morales


The Women Engaged in Action on 1325 (WE Act 1325), through the Center for Peace Education, successfully staged the campaign dubbed “Bangs for the Bangsamoro” last July 28, 2014. The campaign, which coincided with PNoy’s 5th State of the Nation Address, calls for the meaningful participation of women in the Bangsamoro through the symbolic act of having one’s bangs cut.

“The decision of having bangs does not come easy especially if one has worn the same hairstyle for years. This is similar to women’s participation. In political processes, men have been used to taking the lead or in dominating the political scene. It is time for change. It is time for women to participate,” says Dr. Jasmin Galace, executive director of the Center for Peace Education.

“The campaign is a non-violent means of expressing support for a political cause by encouraging the general public to get their bangs cut to show their support for the inclusion and meaningful participation of women in the Bangsamoro and their support for the peace process in general,” adds Galace. Professional stylists from salons in the metro offered their services for the activity.

Students from the College of International, Humanitarian and Development Studies (CIHDS) and the Department of Communication as well as student organizations such as Pax Christi Miriam College, International Studies Society, Sanggunian ng Mag-aaral  ng Miriam, and Chi Rho came in full force to support the cause.

Apart from Galace, other administrators who shared their time through messages of support were Vice President for Mission, Identity and Development, Rose Linda Bautista; Executive Director of the Women and Gender Institute, Prof Aurora de Dios; and CIHDS Dean Caridad Tharan.

Members of the Women Engaged in Action on 1325 and the Mindanao Solidarity Network who gave their respective solidarity messages were Karen Tañada (Gaston Z. Ortigas Peace Institute), Sr. Arnold Noel (Balay Rehabilitation Center), Rebecca Lozada (Philippine Coalition for the International Criminal Court), Atty. Cheska Sarenas (Sentro ng Alternatibong Lingap Pangligal), Bobet Corral and Beng Dionella (Aksyon Para sa Kapayapaan at Katarungan) gave their.

Rene Molina from partner community Maharlika Village in Taguig also gave a message highlighting the importance of unity and peace for all those involved.
Prof. Miriam Coronel-Ferrer, chairperson of the government of the Philippines Peace Panel on the GPH-MILF peace process, joined the public action and had her bangs trimmed. In her statement, she assured that the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro will be reflected in the Bangsamoro Basic Law.

Highlighting the activity were performances by the MC students and children from the Muslim community in Taguig. Mona Achmad, a known kulintang player performed throughout the public action while passersby gamely honked their horns in show of support.


MANILA, Philippines - Victory is sweeter the third time around. The Miriam College High School (MCHS) glee club knows how it feels after winning for the third time at the 2014 World Choir Games (WCG)  held in Riga, Latvia earlier this month. They came home triumphant, this time winning a gold diploma in Sacred Music with Accompaniment Open Category and a gold medal in the Youth Choirs of Equal Voices Champions Category.

“We prepared more difficult pieces this time around. The competitors were also better and tougher compared to the choirs which participated in the US,” says Nancy Roman, conductor of the 43-member choir. She is also the assistant principal for Student Affairs of MCHS.

The WCG – the largest choir competition in the world – is a dream arena for competitive choral groups like the MCHS Glee Club.  Its jury consists of international choral experts from all over the world who evaluate a single piece according to authenticity, intonation and fidelity to the score or interpretation. Performances are evaluated according to the sound quality of the choir and overall artistic impression.

The MCHS Glee Club first joined the WCG in 2010 in Shaoxing, China where they bagged two silver diplomas in the Youth Choirs of Equal Voices and Sacred Music categories. Their China experience helped them set a new benchmark as they planned for the next WCG in 2012 which was held in Cincinnati, Ohio. This time they bested 30 choirs from all over the world and came home with two gold diplomas in the Sacred Music and Youth Choirs of Equal Voices categories. They were declared category winners in both.

Their US feat qualified them for the tougher Champions category in Riga. Only choirs who have won gold awards in the past or its equivalent in other international competitions were qualified to join.

“We qualified for the champions round in both categories but due to the schedule, we decided to participate only in the Youth of Equal Voices and went for the Open Category instead for the Sacred Music with Accompaniment,” explains Roman.

They sang a total of eight pieces for both categories, some more difficult than their song choices in the previous WCG competitions. “I chose pieces that will bring out different flavors from the glee club, pieces that show contrasts with a higher level of difficulty,” she says.

The dynamic all-female group had been practicing the whole summer leading to this biennial competition.

For the Sacred Music with Accompaniment, they sang Ave Maria by Tomas Luis de Victoria, Ave Verum Corpus by Miklos Kocsar, Loving Shepherd of Thy Sheep by Alejandro Consolacion II and Ave Regina Coelorum by Ko Matsushita. For the Youth Choirs of Equal Voices they performed Hotaru Koi by Ro Ogura, Magos A Rutafa by Bardos Lajos, Ave Maria by Ko Matsushita and Dayo Dayo Kupita by Nilo Alcala II.

On top of the awards was the priceless experience of traveling to a country dubbed as the European Capital of Culture. Riga, Latvia’s capital, is especially known for its impressive list of UNESCO Heritage sites and its annual showcase of cultural activities in the arts, music and theater. July also happens to be a perfect time to be in the country, with its warm weather and abundant produce.

“The girls knew that Latvia was not a rice country so they were prepared to eat potatoes for a long time,” quips Roman. “They actually like Latvian food, care of a restaurant named Lido which serves traditional Latvian food.”

Roman continues to dream big for the glee club, which welcomes new members each year to replace graduating members.

“We might join some international festivals in the future or even plan a tour of Europe,” Roman shares. She’s also setting her sights on the National Music Competitions for Young Artists (NAMCYA), a local competition they have yet to join, and the One Rhythm One Nation festival in New York in 2016.

Indeed a big stage awaits the MCHS Glee Club, now rightfully considered one of the best choral groups in the world.


SOURCE: Philippine Star > www.philstar.com/starweek-magazine/2014/08/03/1352784/golden-harmonies


In support of the institutional strategic goal of becoming a benchmark for girls’ education, the Office of the President and the High School Unit for the second time hosted Dan and Shabnam Butler from the Minnesota state education system. Dan focused on meeting with and training STEM teachers and students about the more practical dimensions of mathematics.

He also had the chance to train 28 STEM teachers from the member institutions of the newly-formed Philippine Alliance for Girls’ Education (PAGE) which Miriam College convened. Dan is a mathematics education specialist who has trained some Middle School and High School teachers at the Anja Greer Conference in Science, Mathematics, and Technology at the Philip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire since 2011.

Meanwhile, Shabnam, Dan’s wife who specializes in special education for differently-abled students, facilitated a meeting with Middle School guidance counselors concerning interventions for emotional and behavioral disabilities.  She shared best practices and recommendations pertinent to the management of giftedness programs. HS Principal Dr. Edizon A. Fermin, HS Assistant Principal for Academic Affairs Ms. Reina M. Rama, HS OIC-Mathematics and Computational Science Chair Ms. Joan Michelle F. Malvas, and Technical Assistant to the College President Ma. Cristina L. Ibañez coordinated the visit of the two specialists.

Multi-awarded broadcast journalist Kara Patria C. David inspired participants with her insights on the topic “Parents as Nurturing Career Development Partners” at the recently concluded MCHS Parents’ General Assembly. The event, which was attended by over 900 parents, guardians, and faculty members, was held at the Marian Auditorium last June 28, 2014.

More than an annual school orientation, the activity enabled participants to appreciate further changes in the curriculum geared towards clarifying and nurturing students’ career goals and plans.

After the very humorous, engaging, and inspiring message of David, MCHS Principal Dr. Edizon A. Fermin, ILAW Center Head Dr. Ronaldo A. Motilla, MCMS Guidance Supervisor Ma. Rosanna Monica V. Marabut, and MCHS Guidance Supervisor Jeanilyn G. Ibarrola responded to questions concerning the topic “Parenting the New Generation of Career-oriented Learners” in a panel discussion moderated by newly-elected Family Council Executive Board President Ma. Cecilia F. Salapantan.

In view of the institutional thrust of close home-school collaboration, homeroom meeting and election of parent officers followed after the two sessions.


Sr. Daisy Ayuson Carmona of the Camillian Sisters (right photo) placed 5th in the 2014 Social Work Licensure Examination held last June 29-30, 2014. Sr. Daisy earned her BS Social Work degree under the school’s Professional Program last March 2014.

Aside from Sr. Daisy, Royvie Anne Mae Garcia Colobong (BSSW 2014) and Ma. Luisa Viterbo Agustin (BSSW 2012) also passed the board. 
For its Social Work graduates from 2012 to 2014, Miriam College has maintained a 100% passing rate in the Board Exam. Out of the 2,031 examiners this year, 54.65%  or 1,130 passed.

Photo shows the new social workers with faculty and MC administrators during a simple recognition ceremony last July 7, 2014. From left are Dr. Glenda E. Fortez, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Sr. Daisy; Prof. Luz Martinez, Colobong;  Agustin; Dr. Caridad Tharan, CIHDS Dean; Prof. Malou Turalde-Jarabe, SW faculty; Prof. Pacita Fortin, SW Department Chairperson.


Three Miriam College Lower School students were part of the MC football team that won 1st runner-up at the Girls 12 and under division of the Havaianas Football Cup held at the Alabang Country Club Fields last June 8, 2014.

Members of the team who joined were  Astrid Heiress O. Ignacio (5-Mahinahon), Maria Chrisia S. Espiritu (5-Maunawain), and Aneeza Jhulia S. Gutierrez (5-Malikhain).

They were coached by Robert V. Manlulo.

MCHS Glee Club, Youth Choirs in Equal Voices, Champions Category, World Choir Games 2014 from Mary Rose Peña on Vimeo.

Victory is sweeter the third time around.  The Miriam College High School (MCHS) Glee Club sure knows how it feels after winning for the third time at the 2014 World Choir Games (WGC)  held in Riga, Latvia last July 9-19. They came home triumphant, this time winning a Gold Diploma in the Sacred Music with Accompaniment Open Category and a Gold Medal in the Youth Choirs of Equal Voices Champions Category.

“We prepared more difficult pieces this time around. The competitors this year were better and tougher compared to the choirs which participated in the U.S.,” says Nancy Roman, assistant principal for Student Affairs of MCHS and conductor of the 34-member choir.

The WCG—the largest choir competition in the world and considered the “Olympics of choir”— is a dream arena for competitive choral groups like the MCHS Glee Club.  Its jury consists of international choral experts from all over the world who evaluate every single piece according to authenticity, intonation and fidelity to the score or interpretation. Overall performances are evaluated according to the sound quality of the choir and overall artistic impression. 

MCHS Glee Club group during the Equal Voices competition (top) and after receiving their Musicra Sacra award (bottom) 

The MCHS Glee Club first joined the WCG in 2010 in Shiaoxing, China where they bagged Two Silver Diplomas in the Youth Choirs of Equal Voices and Sacred Music categories. Their China experience helped them set a new benchmark as they prepared for the 2012 WCG competition which was then held in Cincinnati, Ohio in the U.S. Here,  they bested 30 choirs all over the world and came home with two Gold Diplomas in the Sacred Music and Youth Choirs of Equal Voices categories.

Their US feat qualified them for the tougher Champions category in Riga. Only choirs who have won gold awards in the past or its equivalent in other international competitions were qualified to join.


Ms. Roman and the girls spreading MC pride in Latvia. (Photos by Ms. Charlene Albino)


The group sang  a total of eight pieces for both categories—some more difficult than their song choices in the previous WCG competitions. The dynamic all-female group has been practicing the whole summer leading to this biennial competition.

Roman is eyeing the National Music Competitions for Young Artists (NAMCYA), a local competition they have yet to join, as well as the the One Rhythm One Nation festival in New York in 2016.

Pages: Prev1234567...52NextReturn Top



News Archives
 
View All Tags