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Meet millennial kid Charlie Manzano, the bemedalled 4-foot-4 package who has yet to grasp how good she can be in a sport in quest of a new heroine

Spotting gymnast Ancilla Lucia Mari “Charlie” Manzano as a naturally gifted athlete was easy.

Hanging from a bar, Charlie managed to do the pullover, a move in which a gymnast flips over a horizontal rod. She was just four.
“The first time we saw her on the bars, we were surprised,” says Mark Mogol, one of Charlie’s coaches at Club Gymnastica. “Right away, she knew how to hang. Then she did the pullover. And we said, ‘Wow, this kid is good.’”

It was just a summer gymnastics class. Charlie’s parents signed her up, thinking nothing much of it, just an activity their only child might enjoy just like when she did ballet.

So when coaches gave the heads-up that their daughter may be a bundle of talent, it was all a surprise.

“There’s really no one into sports in the family,” Charlie’s mother, Noreen, says with a laugh. “I wondered where she got it from.”

Charlie admits having little memory of her first foray into the sport. Now 10, there’s still no telling though if this lithe 4-foot-4 package has already grasped how good she can be.

Months after her incredible debut in the 2016 Palarong Pambansa— where she won four gold medals in all—Charlie remains as the quiet but highly efficient student.
“From the start, we knew that Charlie can compete,” says Mogol. “But the problem that we had was she doesn’t talk much. When you talk to her, she just nods. But it turned out to be good because she just follows our instructions. Other gymnasts can say yes, but they can’t do it. With Charlie, it’s automatic. Once she nods, she gets it.”

Charlie, though, isn’t exactly shy.

After a recent club tournament, where Charlie bagged the all-around title, she looked happy hanging out with gymnast friends and checking her socials on her smart phone.

But ask her how the tournament was and Charlie will say, “It’s fun.”

Push more questions, like if she found any event difficult or if she got nervous, Charlie nods in each one.

“That’s how she is,” says Noreen. “When I tutor her at home, she listens and follows. Sometimes, she just keeps saying yes. So I tell her, ‘You have to show me that you know that.’ But after her test, it turns out okay. She knows.”

“It’s the same thing in the gym,” adds Noreen. “You’d think she didn’t absorb it. But in competition, you can see she actually understood it.”

A dentist by profession, Noreen gave up her career after getting pregnant with Charlie. She’s now a dedicated athlete’s mom, driving Charlie to training five times a week, accompanying her to local and international tournaments, while also making sure that she balances her sport and studies.

“I guess it’s all fun for her,” says Noreen. “But what’s important for us is she’s enjoying it. We ask her everytime in competition if it’s okay, if she wants to do this. If she says yes, then we go.”

Charlie, now a fifth grader at Miriam College, also excels in school as she has been a consistent recipient of the academic excellence award.

On the gym floor, she has hauled over 50 medals in four years of competition in local events and two international club tournaments in Singapore and Bangkok, where she again ruled as the individual all-around winner.

“She was six years old in her first competition,” says Mogol. “She competed against gymnasts who already won medals before. But she won the all-around right away, so we knew that this kid will get even better.”

Last April, just four months before she turned 10, Charlie emerged as an instant star in the 2016 Palaro in Legazpi City, Albay. Debuting on the biggest national stage for young athletes, Charlie made it all look easy as she picked up gold medals in the single bar, floor exercises and team event, on top of silvers in the balance beam and vault, to run away with the all-around title.

“At first, her mommy was having second thoughts if Charlie could really compete in the Palaro,” Mogol recalls. “But after seeing her win the overall title in the NCR (National Capital Region-Palaro) qualifiers, we knew she could do it. So we kept telling her mommy not to worry about Charlie.”

Noreen thinks the pressure of competing weighs more on her and husband Inky than on Charlie herself.

“I’m the one who gets stressed,” says Noreen. “I pray the novena. I really get nervous when she competes.”

But Charlie’s parents have already braced themselves for more of it.

“Our goal for her is to be a member of the Philippine team, to be one of the best gymnasts in the Philippines,” says Mogol. “She can be in the national pool by 14 or 15, be in the junior team.”

Save for her sparkly leotard, there’s no air about her that she’s a rising gymnast armed with remarkable flexibility.

Ask Charlie what motivates her and who she looks up to, she just shrugs.

“You like Bea Lucero, right?” Noreen offers.

Thirty years ago, Lucero inspired many young girls to do cartwheels and flips after a popular chocolate drink commercial made the cute, peppy gymnast the face of the sport.

But since then, there hasn’t been a local gymnast who captured the nation’s heart the way Lucero did.

Charlie’s coaches believes she can. Her family hopes she can. And Charlie may just do it, even if it’s in in her own quiet way.



SOURCE: Philippine Daily Inquirer >
 http://sports.inquirer.net/226073/phenom

Miriam College - Women and Gender Institute (WAGI) and the Women’s Peace collective (WPC), formerly known as the Women’s Peace Table (WPT), will be launching several publications on October 21, 2016, 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM, Discovery Suites, Columbus, 42nd Floor, ADB Avenue, Ortigas, Pasig City

These publications  are the Gender, Peace, and Security Infopack, The Peace Journey: Stories of Women from the Women’s Peace Collective (WPC), Women, Peace and Security: Increasing Participation of Women in Conflict Areas in Mindanao: End of Project Report, and the Baseline Research on the Issues and Status of Women in Mindanao. Additionally, a short video documentary presentation will be shown. 

The Women’s Peace Collective (WPC) is a network of women’s organizations, professionals, community leaders, and individual peace advocates working towards peace and justice. The organization recently finished a project supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) entitled, “Women, Peace and Security: Increasing Participation of Women in Conflict Areas in Mindanao”. Through this project, WPC was able to build a national constituency for peace among women and different strategic groups (such as business, media, youth, religious, legislature, and the academe) in support of the Bangsamoro Peace agreement; develop the capacity of women peace negotiators, peace builders and peace advocates to ensure a gender responsive Bangsamoro Basic Law; and localize the implementation of the Philippine Action Plan for Women, Peace and Security (NAP-WPS) in USAID’s six selected conflict-affected areas in Mindanao namely, North Cotabato, Basilan, South Basilan, Lanao del Sur, Sulu, and Zamboanga. 

For more information, please contact Ms. Jing Dacayo or Ms. Mel Reyes at telephone numbers 435-9229 and 5805400 ext. 3590, or email us at and .

Six Filipino footballers earned tickets to the 12-day Astro Kem Bola Overseas Training Programme in Barcelona, Spain this December after undergoing rigid training and tryouts held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last month.

The six are Lance Lawrence Locsin, Jared Alexander Pena, Ryan Philip Johansson, Astrid Heiress Ignacio, Mikaela Jacqueline Villacin, and Jasmined Cassandra Agustin.

Together, they are part of the 32 players who get the chance to train with top Premier League team FC Barcelona from Dec. 5 to 20.

“These six kids will go to Barcelona to train with the best team in the world,” said Rofil Sheldon Magto, Globe citizenship manager, who presented two of the kids in the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Forum Tuesday at Shakey’s Malate together with Philippine Azkals assistant coach Chieffy Caligdong, also the Globe sports development manager and team captain of Green Archers United.

Astrid Ignacio,12, and Locsin, 10 said they are both looking forward to the great experience, and of course, meeting Barca star players such as Lionel Messi, Neymar, and Andres Iniesta.

“I expect to learn more knowledge and skills, and at the same time, meet in person Barcelona players Mesi and Neymar,” said Ignacio, a Miriam College studentwho’s playing football for three years now.

Barcelona of course, is home to legendary Filipino-Spanish football superstar Paulinho Alcantara, who was recently surpassed by Mesi as the team’s all-time highest goal scorer.

The six players were among the 12 Filipinos who qualified for the Astro Kem Bola camp held in the Malaysian capital last September, where a total of 72 players from Malaysia and Singapore participated.

“Attitude and positive character, yun ang pinakaiba sa kanila at hindi basta yung training na binigay sa kanila sa Malaysia,” said Caligdong on what he sees in Ignacio and Locsin that allowed them to be included in the once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The team was the product of a two-month long TM Football Para Sa Bayan (TM FPSB) talent search organized by Globe Telecom in July and August.

Globe was tapped by Astro Kasih, the corporate foundation and corporate social responsibility of Malaysia media and entertainment powerhouse Astro, to be its partner in discovering talented young athletes and helping them further harness their craft.

Globe director for Citizenship Fernando Esguerra expressed elation over the selection of the six players especially after going through tough competition against players from the South East Asian region.


SOURCE: ABS-CBN > sports.abs-cbn.com/football/news/2016/10/25/young-pinoy-footballers-train-fc-bacelona-17070

SIX Filipino footballers earned tickets to the 12-day Astro Kem Bola Overseas Training Programme in Barcelona, Spain this December after undergoing rigid training and tryouts held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last month.

The six are Lance Lawrence Locsin, Jared Alexander Pena, Ryan Philip Johansson, Astrid Heiress Ignacio, Mikaela Jacqueline Villacin, and Jasmined Cassandra Agustin.

Together, they are part of the 32 players who get the chance to train with top Premier League team FC Barcelona from Dec. 5 to 20.

“These six kids will go to Barcelona to train with the best team in the world,” said Rofil Sheldon Magto, Globe citizenship manager, who presented two of the kids in the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Forum Tuesday at Shakey’s Malate together with Philippine Azkals assistant coach Chieffy Caligdong, also the Globe sports development manager and team captain of Green Archers United.

Astrid Ignacio, 12, and Locsin, 10 said they are both looking forward to the great experience, and of course, meeting Barca star players such as Lionel Messi, Neymar, and Andres Iniesta.

“I expect to learn more knowledge and skills, and at the same time, meet in person Barcelona players Mesi and Neymar,” said Ignacio, a Miriam College student who’s playing football for three years now.

Barcelona of course, is home to legendary Filipino-Spanish football superstar Paulinho Alcantara, who was recently surpassed by Mesi as the team’s all-time highest goal scorer.

The six players were among the 12 Filipinos who qualified for the Astro Kem Bola camp held in the Malaysian capital last September, where a total of 72 players from Malaysia and Singapore participated.

“Attitude and positive character, yun ang pinakaiba sa kanila at hindi basta yung training na binigay sa kanila sa Malaysia,” said Caligdong on what he sees in Ignacio and Locsin that allowed them to be included in the once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The team was the product of a two-month long TM Football Para Sa Bayan (TM FPSB) talent search organized by Globe Telecom in July and August.

Globe was tapped by Astro Kasih, the corporate foundation and corporate social responsibility of Malaysia media and entertainment powerhouse Astro, to be its partner in discovering talented young athletes and helping them further harness their craft.

Globe director for Citizenship Fernando Esguerra expressed elation over the selection of the six players especially after going through tough competition against players from the South East Asian region.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @gerardmos



SOURCE: SPIN.PH > http://www.spin.ph/football/news/six-young-pinoy-kids-get-rare-chance-to-meet-and-train-and-meet#kLoBhiIx3W8bI54E.99

Last Nov. 8, the Supreme Court decided  that former president Ferdinand Marcos deserves to be given the honor of being buried in the hallowed grounds of the Libingan ng mga Bayani on the basis of a policy that allows soldiers to be buried in that cemetery. What could have been a historic opportunity to make a decision upholding human rights and justice turned into an ignominious and supreme injustice to the Filipino people.

Marcos was not an ordinary soldier; he was a tyrannical dictator who imposed martial law on the Philippines and unleashed a reign of terror for 13 years, leaving on its wake the murder, torture and rape of thousands of Filipinos who resisted the dictatorship. His ill-gotten wealth for his family and friends robbed the Philippine government of billions of pesos and continues to be the object of investigation and court proceedings here and abroad. By dismantling the democratic institutions of the country during martial law, he plunged the country into its lowest political, economic and cultural abyss.

To this day, the Marcos family has neither shown any remorse nor admitted guilt despite the global condemnation of the massive human rights violations committed by their patriarch. With arrogance and impunity, they have initiated a campaign to distort history, reinvent the Marcos years as the golden years in Philippine history, and declare Marcos as a national hero. In this project, the Supreme Court has proven to be an effective accomplice.

To honor him as a hero is mocking the thousands of victims who died and those who were tortured and continue to suffer because they fought and resisted the dictatorship;

To honor him is to say that the massive human rights violations committed by the Marcos regime with impunity; the unprecedented plunder of our country’s resources and the destruction of our democratic institutions never really happened in our recent history;

To honor him as a hero is to deny that the Filipino people exercising their sovereign will, ousted the dictatorship for his crimes against the people during the 1986 People Power Revolution;

Lastly, to honor Marcos is to dishonor the dignity, legitimacy and the very credibility of the Supreme Court itself as an institution that stands for fairness and justice.

We urge the nine Supreme Court justices who supported this decision to reflect on the impact of their decision on the thousands who died and those who are tortured and are reliving their suffering and to consider the future of the Supreme Court, whose credibility has been seriously eroded because of this unjust decision.

As an institution of learning that values VERITAS (truth), peace, justice and the integrity of creation, we will continue to promote an enlightened and critical understanding of the struggles of Filipinos against martial law  and the historic redemption of our freedoms and human rights in the People Power Revolution where Maryknoll/ Miriam College was an active participant.

We promise to promote Philippine history from the prism of those who struggled to fight for democracy and not from the revisionist version of those who are now trying to systematically distort and conceal the brutal realities of the past.

We commit ourselves to always remember and never forget the bitter lessons of the past so we can continue to build a future for the next generations based on respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and dignity of the Filipino people.

PROF. AURORA DE DIOS, executive director, Women and Gender Institute;
DR. JASMIN NARIO-GALACE, executive director, Center for Peace Education;
CARLO GARCIA, executive director, Environmental Studies Institute; 
NIKAELA CORTEZ, president, Sanggunian ng mga Mag-aaral ng Miriam


Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer > opinion.inquirer.net/100168/supreme-injustice#ixzz4UlHjAZt2 

Sisters—perennials, millennials, or mere buds—are invited to take part in tomorrow’s observance of International Women’s Day.
In particular, there will be a forum on “Women and Democracy” to be held at the Little Theater, Miriam College on Katipunan Avenue, Quezon City, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

A special guest at the forum is Vice President Leni Robredo, and she will be joined by Sen. Risa Hontiveros and Sen. Leila de Lima, the last perhaps digitally. The renowned and much-missed duo Inang Laya will lend their artistry to the event. A “public conversation” with all the women present and guests will then follow.

Why should Filipino women be talking of democracy? Well, now more than ever! There is no better time, no more urgent a topic than the threats to democracy presented in these days of EJKs, “tokhang” and creeping authoritarianism, as exemplified by the arrest and detention of De Lima.  If, with the exception of a few hardy champions, our legislators and officials choose to hide behind political expediency and cowardly accommodation, then Filipino women will have to take up the slack. After all, we have long been on the frontline of the battle to establish and then restore democracy on our shores, and I believe we will not shirk our duty and our mission this time around.

Celebrate International Women’s Day, tomorrow at Miriam College, and for the rest of Women’s Month in the streets, in our classrooms, in our homes. The fight continues and grows more urgent with each passing day.

Another “arena” in our battle for our rights and autonomy as women hews closer to home, in our own bodies, in fact, in each woman’s uterus, vagina, and, most important, mind and will.

Women’s groups, reproductive health advocates and even government bodies like the Department of Health and the Population Commission, have issued an urgent message directed at the Supreme Court to lift, as soon as possible, a temporary restraining order blocking the full implementation of the Reproductive Health Law.
Acting on the petition of RH opponents, the Supreme Court in 2015 issued an order preventing the DOH from distributing contraceptive implants, on grounds that these might cause abortions (a fear that has been scientifically disproved).

At the same time, the tribunal also ordered the Food and Drug Administration to go through the entire cycle of certification for ALL family planning devices and supplies, including those that have long been in use but whose licenses will soon expire.

If the TRO lasts much longer, Filipino women will soon lose all access to most forms of contraception. What this means is that our access to life-saving forms of contraception will be curtailed. Already, we are seeing an uptick not just in the number of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, but also in maternal and infant deaths.

This is why the PopCom considers the situation created by the TRO on contraceptives as a looming “public health emergency.” This is because, unless conditions change drastically, the PopCom estimates that the number of mothers dying during childbirth “may also rise by an additional 1,000 deaths a year during the next six years.”

Some people, especially the self-righteous and narrow-minded, may not consider an additional 1,000 mothers dying every year a public health crisis. (Perhaps they’re the same folks who can accept with equanimity over 7,000 EJKs in less than a year?) But I certainly do!

In addition, the PopCom sees the total Philippine population rising to more than 113 million by 2022, from its current total of 104 million. The explosion in the number of new births can be traced in part to the lack of access of women—especially younger women—to contraception. Not only would mistimed pregnancy take a toll on the health of younger (and older) mothers, it would also have adverse effects on the health and chances of survival of newborns and of their surviving siblings as well.
The PopCom in a press release says the lifting of the TRO would be a “gift of health” to Filipino women. It would also be an acknowledgment of the inherent right of women (and men) to reproductive health and to choose the life they want for themselves.


SOURCE: Philippine Daily Inquirer > http://opinion.inquirer.net/102234/women-democracy-bodies#ixzz4abJQoj6O 


The Asia-Pacific Network for International Education and Values Education (APNIEVE) will hold its 16th National Convention in partnership with the University of Northern Philippines in Vigan City, Ilocos Sur on April 26, 27 and 28, 2017. Keynote speaker is Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan, chairperson of the Commission on Higher Education. The convention theme this year is "In Pursuit of Quality Education, the Past, Present, and Future." Conference strands will revolve around the leading-edge thinking about the quality of education; innovative approaches, and practices that improve the quality of education; the assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of the quality of education; and the gaps where more research and efforts are needed to achieve inclusive and quality education by 2030.

Founded in 1995 by Dr. Lourdes R. Quisumbing, UNESCO-APNIEVE aims to promote and develop international education and values education for peace, human rights, democracy, and sustainable development through networking and cooperation among individuals and institutions in the Asia Pacific region. APNIEVE Philippines's current president is Dr. Maria Lourdes Quisumbing-Baybay, vice president for academic affairs of Miriam College.

The annual convention of APNIEVE Philippines gathers teachers and administrators from various colleges and universities from the different regions of the country. For interested participants, you may contact Angelina Bayaua Alcazar at 4354754.


SOURCES: Philippine Daily Inquirer and Business Mirror (published in print on March 27, 2017)

Miriam College and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) recently signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to officially seal their partnership as Philippine hosts to the 6th UNESCO-APEID meeting on Entrepreneurship Education 2017.   This meeting brings together selected participants from the ASEAN, East, South Asia, and the Pacific Region to create a common framework for entrepreneurship curricula and programs in the region. This goal hopes to multiply opportunities for harmonizing entrepreneurship education that is aligned with national goals as well as empower the citizens of ASEAN and other Asia Pacific countries to respond to global demands.

Signing the MOA were (in photo, center) CHED Chairperson Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan and Miriam College (MC) Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Maria Lourdes Q. Baybay witnessed by (from left) the Director for International Affairs Staff Atty. Lily Freida Milla, MC College of Business, Entrepreneurship, and Accountancy (CBEA) Graduate Programs coordinator and ENEDA National President Dr. Elaine L. Boquiren, One Meralco Foundation OIC and event sponsor Neil Celeste Rara,  MC-CBEA Dean and current Country Program Chair for the 6th UNESCO APEID Dr. Antonio M. Lopez.

The signing was held at the Commission on Higher Education main office in Diliman.

The 6th UNESCO-APEID Meeting on Entrepreneurship Education carries the theme “Designing a Relevant and Innovative Entrepreneurship Education: Towards Mutual Recognition of Qualification in ASEAN, East and South Asia.”

It will be held on October 23-25, 2017 at the Marco Polo Hotel in Ortigas on the first two days and at the Miriam College-Henry Sy, Sr. Innovation Center on the third and last day.

On Oct. 6, the Nobel Committee announced that it had awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2017 to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a coalition of nongovernment organizations in 100 countries, in recognition of its role in achieving the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons that was adopted by 122 states on July 7.

In its response to the announcement, the ICAN acknowledged that the treaty is a historic agreement that “offers a powerful, much-needed alternative to a world in which threats of mass destruction are allowed to prevail and, indeed, are escalating.”

Nuclear weapons are the most destructive weapons ever created, and they threaten the very survival of humanity and our Earth. Hence, the elimination of nuclear weapons has been the goal of ICAN from the time the network was established. After the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, ICAN paid tribute to all those who have supported the treaty, particularly the campaigners all over the world, the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or the hibakusha, the victims of nuclear test explosions worldwide, and the states that have signed and ratified the treaty.

It should be a source of pride that the Philippines is one of the first 50 countries to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which was opened for signature last Sept. 20 (United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs). Long before the negotiations on the treaty, our delegation had constantly expressed the Philippines’ strong stand on the abolition of nuclear weapons. In 2015, the Philippine government reiterated this position in a statement at the UN: “We will continue to state the strong case for the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and tirelessly call for the start of a process … that will fill the legal gap for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons.”

It can thus be said that the Philippines has taken a leadership role on the matter even prior to the treaty negotiations. The Philippines has the distinction of being the first Asean country to endorse the “Humanitarian Pledge.” It was also among the first few countries that collectively issued a working paper at the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that highlighted the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of using nuclear weapons. The working paper also cited the need for effective measures toward a legal framework that would ban nuclear weapons.

The “Humanitarian Pledge” reflected a fundamental shift in the international discourse on nuclear disarmament — moving away from a deterrence paradigm and toward one that looks at the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and the demands of true human and planetary security. In 2015, increasing international support for this pledge indicated that many governments were ready to move forward on the issue of prohibiting nuclear weapons, even if the nuclear-weapon states were not ready to join.

The Philippines’ consistent support for the cause culminated in its “yes” vote for the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons last July. It is hoped that the Philippines will continue to take the lead in this matter by ratifying the treaty soon.

* * *

Loreta Navarro-Castro is the program director of the Center for Peace Education, and a professor of international studies and education at Miriam College.


Published at the Philippine Daily Inquirer > opinion.inquirer.net/107823/ph-treaty-banning-nuclear-weapons#ixzz4vLV4qzp0


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