Category: Press

News articles featuring Miriam College from online and printed newspapers, blogs, or websites

SIX Filipino footballers earned tickets to the 12-day Astro Kem Bola Overseas Training Programme in Barcelona, Spain this December after undergoing rigid training and tryouts held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last month.

The six are Lance Lawrence Locsin, Jared Alexander Pena, Ryan Philip Johansson, Astrid Heiress Ignacio, Mikaela Jacqueline Villacin, and Jasmined Cassandra Agustin.

Together, they are part of the 32 players who get the chance to train with top Premier League team FC Barcelona from Dec. 5 to 20.

“These six kids will go to Barcelona to train with the best team in the world,” said Rofil Sheldon Magto, Globe citizenship manager, who presented two of the kids in the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Forum Tuesday at Shakey’s Malate together with Philippine Azkals assistant coach Chieffy Caligdong, also the Globe sports development manager and team captain of Green Archers United.

Astrid Ignacio, 12, and Locsin, 10 said they are both looking forward to the great experience, and of course, meeting Barca star players such as Lionel Messi, Neymar, and Andres Iniesta.

“I expect to learn more knowledge and skills, and at the same time, meet in person Barcelona players Mesi and Neymar,” said Ignacio, a Miriam College student who’s playing football for three years now.

Barcelona of course, is home to legendary Filipino-Spanish football superstar Paulinho Alcantara, who was recently surpassed by Mesi as the team’s all-time highest goal scorer.

The six players were among the 12 Filipinos who qualified for the Astro Kem Bola camp held in the Malaysian capital last September, where a total of 72 players from Malaysia and Singapore participated.

“Attitude and positive character, yun ang pinakaiba sa kanila at hindi basta yung training na binigay sa kanila sa Malaysia,” said Caligdong on what he sees in Ignacio and Locsin that allowed them to be included in the once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The team was the product of a two-month long TM Football Para Sa Bayan (TM FPSB) talent search organized by Globe Telecom in July and August.

Globe was tapped by Astro Kasih, the corporate foundation and corporate social responsibility of Malaysia media and entertainment powerhouse Astro, to be its partner in discovering talented young athletes and helping them further harness their craft.

Globe director for Citizenship Fernando Esguerra expressed elation over the selection of the six players especially after going through tough competition against players from the South East Asian region.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @gerardmos



SOURCE: SPIN.PH > http://www.spin.ph/football/news/six-young-pinoy-kids-get-rare-chance-to-meet-and-train-and-meet#kLoBhiIx3W8bI54E.99

Last Nov. 8, the Supreme Court decided  that former president Ferdinand Marcos deserves to be given the honor of being buried in the hallowed grounds of the Libingan ng mga Bayani on the basis of a policy that allows soldiers to be buried in that cemetery. What could have been a historic opportunity to make a decision upholding human rights and justice turned into an ignominious and supreme injustice to the Filipino people.

Marcos was not an ordinary soldier; he was a tyrannical dictator who imposed martial law on the Philippines and unleashed a reign of terror for 13 years, leaving on its wake the murder, torture and rape of thousands of Filipinos who resisted the dictatorship. His ill-gotten wealth for his family and friends robbed the Philippine government of billions of pesos and continues to be the object of investigation and court proceedings here and abroad. By dismantling the democratic institutions of the country during martial law, he plunged the country into its lowest political, economic and cultural abyss.

To this day, the Marcos family has neither shown any remorse nor admitted guilt despite the global condemnation of the massive human rights violations committed by their patriarch. With arrogance and impunity, they have initiated a campaign to distort history, reinvent the Marcos years as the golden years in Philippine history, and declare Marcos as a national hero. In this project, the Supreme Court has proven to be an effective accomplice.

To honor him as a hero is mocking the thousands of victims who died and those who were tortured and continue to suffer because they fought and resisted the dictatorship;

To honor him is to say that the massive human rights violations committed by the Marcos regime with impunity; the unprecedented plunder of our country’s resources and the destruction of our democratic institutions never really happened in our recent history;

To honor him as a hero is to deny that the Filipino people exercising their sovereign will, ousted the dictatorship for his crimes against the people during the 1986 People Power Revolution;

Lastly, to honor Marcos is to dishonor the dignity, legitimacy and the very credibility of the Supreme Court itself as an institution that stands for fairness and justice.

We urge the nine Supreme Court justices who supported this decision to reflect on the impact of their decision on the thousands who died and those who are tortured and are reliving their suffering and to consider the future of the Supreme Court, whose credibility has been seriously eroded because of this unjust decision.

As an institution of learning that values VERITAS (truth), peace, justice and the integrity of creation, we will continue to promote an enlightened and critical understanding of the struggles of Filipinos against martial law  and the historic redemption of our freedoms and human rights in the People Power Revolution where Maryknoll/ Miriam College was an active participant.

We promise to promote Philippine history from the prism of those who struggled to fight for democracy and not from the revisionist version of those who are now trying to systematically distort and conceal the brutal realities of the past.

We commit ourselves to always remember and never forget the bitter lessons of the past so we can continue to build a future for the next generations based on respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and dignity of the Filipino people.

PROF. AURORA DE DIOS, executive director, Women and Gender Institute;
DR. JASMIN NARIO-GALACE, executive director, Center for Peace Education;
CARLO GARCIA, executive director, Environmental Studies Institute; 
NIKAELA CORTEZ, president, Sanggunian ng mga Mag-aaral ng Miriam


Source: Philippine Daily Inquirer > opinion.inquirer.net/100168/supreme-injustice#ixzz4UlHjAZt2 

Sisters—perennials, millennials, or mere buds—are invited to take part in tomorrow’s observance of International Women’s Day.
In particular, there will be a forum on “Women and Democracy” to be held at the Little Theater, Miriam College on Katipunan Avenue, Quezon City, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

A special guest at the forum is Vice President Leni Robredo, and she will be joined by Sen. Risa Hontiveros and Sen. Leila de Lima, the last perhaps digitally. The renowned and much-missed duo Inang Laya will lend their artistry to the event. A “public conversation” with all the women present and guests will then follow.

Why should Filipino women be talking of democracy? Well, now more than ever! There is no better time, no more urgent a topic than the threats to democracy presented in these days of EJKs, “tokhang” and creeping authoritarianism, as exemplified by the arrest and detention of De Lima.  If, with the exception of a few hardy champions, our legislators and officials choose to hide behind political expediency and cowardly accommodation, then Filipino women will have to take up the slack. After all, we have long been on the frontline of the battle to establish and then restore democracy on our shores, and I believe we will not shirk our duty and our mission this time around.

Celebrate International Women’s Day, tomorrow at Miriam College, and for the rest of Women’s Month in the streets, in our classrooms, in our homes. The fight continues and grows more urgent with each passing day.

Another “arena” in our battle for our rights and autonomy as women hews closer to home, in our own bodies, in fact, in each woman’s uterus, vagina, and, most important, mind and will.

Women’s groups, reproductive health advocates and even government bodies like the Department of Health and the Population Commission, have issued an urgent message directed at the Supreme Court to lift, as soon as possible, a temporary restraining order blocking the full implementation of the Reproductive Health Law.
Acting on the petition of RH opponents, the Supreme Court in 2015 issued an order preventing the DOH from distributing contraceptive implants, on grounds that these might cause abortions (a fear that has been scientifically disproved).

At the same time, the tribunal also ordered the Food and Drug Administration to go through the entire cycle of certification for ALL family planning devices and supplies, including those that have long been in use but whose licenses will soon expire.

If the TRO lasts much longer, Filipino women will soon lose all access to most forms of contraception. What this means is that our access to life-saving forms of contraception will be curtailed. Already, we are seeing an uptick not just in the number of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, but also in maternal and infant deaths.

This is why the PopCom considers the situation created by the TRO on contraceptives as a looming “public health emergency.” This is because, unless conditions change drastically, the PopCom estimates that the number of mothers dying during childbirth “may also rise by an additional 1,000 deaths a year during the next six years.”

Some people, especially the self-righteous and narrow-minded, may not consider an additional 1,000 mothers dying every year a public health crisis. (Perhaps they’re the same folks who can accept with equanimity over 7,000 EJKs in less than a year?) But I certainly do!

In addition, the PopCom sees the total Philippine population rising to more than 113 million by 2022, from its current total of 104 million. The explosion in the number of new births can be traced in part to the lack of access of women—especially younger women—to contraception. Not only would mistimed pregnancy take a toll on the health of younger (and older) mothers, it would also have adverse effects on the health and chances of survival of newborns and of their surviving siblings as well.
The PopCom in a press release says the lifting of the TRO would be a “gift of health” to Filipino women. It would also be an acknowledgment of the inherent right of women (and men) to reproductive health and to choose the life they want for themselves.


SOURCE: Philippine Daily Inquirer > http://opinion.inquirer.net/102234/women-democracy-bodies#ixzz4abJQoj6O 


The Asia-Pacific Network for International Education and Values Education (APNIEVE) will hold its 16th National Convention in partnership with the University of Northern Philippines in Vigan City, Ilocos Sur on April 26, 27 and 28, 2017. Keynote speaker is Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan, chairperson of the Commission on Higher Education. The convention theme this year is "In Pursuit of Quality Education, the Past, Present, and Future." Conference strands will revolve around the leading-edge thinking about the quality of education; innovative approaches, and practices that improve the quality of education; the assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of the quality of education; and the gaps where more research and efforts are needed to achieve inclusive and quality education by 2030.

Founded in 1995 by Dr. Lourdes R. Quisumbing, UNESCO-APNIEVE aims to promote and develop international education and values education for peace, human rights, democracy, and sustainable development through networking and cooperation among individuals and institutions in the Asia Pacific region. APNIEVE Philippines's current president is Dr. Maria Lourdes Quisumbing-Baybay, vice president for academic affairs of Miriam College.

The annual convention of APNIEVE Philippines gathers teachers and administrators from various colleges and universities from the different regions of the country. For interested participants, you may contact Angelina Bayaua Alcazar at 4354754.


SOURCES: Philippine Daily Inquirer and Business Mirror (published in print on March 27, 2017)

Miriam College and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) recently signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to officially seal their partnership as Philippine hosts to the 6th UNESCO-APEID meeting on Entrepreneurship Education 2017.   This meeting brings together selected participants from the ASEAN, East, South Asia, and the Pacific Region to create a common framework for entrepreneurship curricula and programs in the region. This goal hopes to multiply opportunities for harmonizing entrepreneurship education that is aligned with national goals as well as empower the citizens of ASEAN and other Asia Pacific countries to respond to global demands.

Signing the MOA were (in photo, center) CHED Chairperson Dr. Patricia B. Licuanan and Miriam College (MC) Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Maria Lourdes Q. Baybay witnessed by (from left) the Director for International Affairs Staff Atty. Lily Freida Milla, MC College of Business, Entrepreneurship, and Accountancy (CBEA) Graduate Programs coordinator and ENEDA National President Dr. Elaine L. Boquiren, One Meralco Foundation OIC and event sponsor Neil Celeste Rara,  MC-CBEA Dean and current Country Program Chair for the 6th UNESCO APEID Dr. Antonio M. Lopez.

The signing was held at the Commission on Higher Education main office in Diliman.

The 6th UNESCO-APEID Meeting on Entrepreneurship Education carries the theme “Designing a Relevant and Innovative Entrepreneurship Education: Towards Mutual Recognition of Qualification in ASEAN, East and South Asia.”

It will be held on October 23-25, 2017 at the Marco Polo Hotel in Ortigas on the first two days and at the Miriam College-Henry Sy, Sr. Innovation Center on the third and last day.


Published Online at:

Manila Bulletin: technology.mb.com.ph/2017/10/17/miriam-college-ched-ink-moa-for-the-6th-unesco-apeid-meeting-on-entrepreneurship-education
Daily Star PH: www.dailystarph.com/miriam-college-ched-ink-moa-for-the-6th-unesco-apeid-meeting-on-entrepreneurship-education-manila-bulletin-technology
News Bytes: newsbytes.ph/2017/10/14/miriam-college-ched-partner-to-host-asian-entrepreneurship-meet


Published in Print at:

Philippine Daily Inquirer, October 02, 2017


On Oct. 6, the Nobel Committee announced that it had awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2017 to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a coalition of nongovernment organizations in 100 countries, in recognition of its role in achieving the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons that was adopted by 122 states on July 7.

In its response to the announcement, the ICAN acknowledged that the treaty is a historic agreement that “offers a powerful, much-needed alternative to a world in which threats of mass destruction are allowed to prevail and, indeed, are escalating.”

Nuclear weapons are the most destructive weapons ever created, and they threaten the very survival of humanity and our Earth. Hence, the elimination of nuclear weapons has been the goal of ICAN from the time the network was established. After the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, ICAN paid tribute to all those who have supported the treaty, particularly the campaigners all over the world, the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or the hibakusha, the victims of nuclear test explosions worldwide, and the states that have signed and ratified the treaty.

It should be a source of pride that the Philippines is one of the first 50 countries to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which was opened for signature last Sept. 20 (United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs). Long before the negotiations on the treaty, our delegation had constantly expressed the Philippines’ strong stand on the abolition of nuclear weapons. In 2015, the Philippine government reiterated this position in a statement at the UN: “We will continue to state the strong case for the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and tirelessly call for the start of a process … that will fill the legal gap for the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons.”

It can thus be said that the Philippines has taken a leadership role on the matter even prior to the treaty negotiations. The Philippines has the distinction of being the first Asean country to endorse the “Humanitarian Pledge.” It was also among the first few countries that collectively issued a working paper at the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that highlighted the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of using nuclear weapons. The working paper also cited the need for effective measures toward a legal framework that would ban nuclear weapons.

The “Humanitarian Pledge” reflected a fundamental shift in the international discourse on nuclear disarmament — moving away from a deterrence paradigm and toward one that looks at the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons and the demands of true human and planetary security. In 2015, increasing international support for this pledge indicated that many governments were ready to move forward on the issue of prohibiting nuclear weapons, even if the nuclear-weapon states were not ready to join.

The Philippines’ consistent support for the cause culminated in its “yes” vote for the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons last July. It is hoped that the Philippines will continue to take the lead in this matter by ratifying the treaty soon.

* * *

Loreta Navarro-Castro is the program director of the Center for Peace Education, and a professor of international studies and education at Miriam College.


Published at the Philippine Daily Inquirer > opinion.inquirer.net/107823/ph-treaty-banning-nuclear-weapons#ixzz4vLV4qzp0


MANILA, Philippines – Former education secretary Lourdes Quisumbing died on Saturday, October 14. She was 96.

Miriam College announced Quisumbing's death on Sunday, October 15. The education advocate was a professor emeritus and former president of the college.

Quisumbing was also the dean of St Theresa's College (STC), dean of the Graduate School of Education at De La Salle University (DLSU) in Manila, and chairperson of Graduate Education at University of San Carlos (USC) in Cebu.

She is best known for her stint as the secretary of the Department of Education, Culture, and Sports or DECS – now the Department of Education – during the time of the late president Corazon Aquino. She was the first female to hold the post.

"Her tenure marked the expansion of free public education to the secondary level, an increase in the share of education in the national budget, rationalization of higher education, and an emphasis on values education," said Miriam College in its news release.

After 4 years in the Aquino Cabinet, Quisumbing was appointed as secretary-general of the UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines, giving her the rank of ambassador in the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA). She served in this capacity until her retirement in 1998.

Even after retiring from public service, she continued working for the education sector as chairperson of the STC Board in Cebu. She was also president of the UNESCO-Asia Pacific Network for International Education and Values Education (APNIEVE) and APNIEVE Philippines.

She finished her bachelor's degree in Education as a summa cum laude graduate of STC. She then pursued her master's degree in Education at USC, also finishing summa cum laude. Quisumbing capped her studies with a PhD in Education from the University of Santo Tomas (UST) in Manila.

The esteemed Cebu native is survived by 8 of her 10 children, 27 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren, and 3 great-great-grandchildren.



Published online on:
Rappler - https://www.rappler.com/nation/185391-former-education-secretary-lourdes-quisumbing-death

Also published on:
Philippine Daily Inquirer -  newsinfo.inquirer.net/938087/first-female-education-secretary-lourdes-quisumbing-dies-at-96#ixzz4vvFtzdXI
Radyo Inquirer - radyo.inquirer.net/84871/unang-babaeng-kalihim-ng-deped-pumanaw-na-sa-edad-na-96
ABS-CBN News - news.abs-cbn.com/news/10/16/17/former-education-secretary-lourdes-quisumbing-passes-away
The Philippine Star (print)
Manila Bulletin (print)
Manila Times (print)


They topped the Asian English Olympics two years in a row and they back, this time to conquer the world.

One of the Miriam College teams who competed in the senior division ranked 9th overall in the final round of the the World Scholar's Cup Tournament of Champions held at Yale University from November 10 to 14, 2017. They are the only Filipino team who bested 330 other teams (approximately 1000 student finalists ages 11-16 years old) from all over the world. A total of sixteen students from Miriam College Middle School and High School were at the tournament.  The competition is hosted by the Yale International Relations Association.

Metal detectors at the airports will surely find 90 medallions and 3 trophies something great. The junior division team won a total of 23 individual silver medals, 22 individual gold medals, 9 team silver medals, and 6 team gold medals. Meanwhile, the senior division team bagged a total of 9 individual silver medals, 17 individual gold medals, 1 team silver medal, 3 team gold medals, 1 individual trophy, and 2 team trophies. The teams competed in debate, scholar’s bowl (a quiz show), collaborative writing, and the scholar"s challenge – all configured as creative academic competitions. Know more of these events at http://www.scholarscup.org/events/.

The event webpage declares, “The Tournament of Champions is more than just another Global Round. You’ll have the chance to interact with and learn directly from Yale students and faculty. You’ll attend a special panel on college life and on how to leverage your World Scholar’s Cup experience as part of your admissions portfolio.”  Now this is how brave Filipino girls conquer the world of infinite possibilities.


Miriam College students who participated in the junior division hold the Philippine flag proudly. Photo courtesy of Miriam College.



Filipina middle school and high school students from Miriam College emerged triumphant at the World Scholar’s Cup Tournament of Champions, hosted by the Yale International Relations Association and held in Yale University in the United States from November 10 to 14.

According to a press release, students Mary Katherine DJ San Miguel, Aleeza Moira Tiongson, and Alyssa Santana competed as a team in the Team Debate, Collaborative Writing, Scholar’s Bowl (a group quiz bee), and Scholar’s Challenge (a multiple-choice test where you can choose more than one answer) events. They earned a total of 29 gold medals, 21 silver medals, and three trophies as part of the senior division (students 15 years old and above).

The team ranked ninth, besting more than 300 junior and senior division teams in the final rounds of the WSCToC. They were also declared Top 1 in Southeast Asia for the same division.

2,200 scholars from 50 countries competed in the senior division. Nine other schools from the Philippines also competed, with Immaculate Conception Academy getting the Top 10 spot.

In the junior division, the 13-member team made up of Alize Madayag, Juliana Guillermo, Samantha Arcenas, Leica Cecilia, Joie Ocampo, Jiana Lim, Marina Fagela, Keithley Mirandilla, Katrina Asedillo, Angela Lim, Monnica Carbonilla, Alyssa Salazar, and Maxene De Castro won a total of 23 individual silver medals, 22 individual gold medals, nine team silver medals, and six team gold medals in the Team Debate, Collaborative Writing, Scholar’s Bowl, and Scholar’s Challenge events.

Almost 1,200 scholars competed in the junior division (students 14 years old and below). Lim finished second place in the Literature category of the Scholar’s Challenge, while Asedillo placed seventh, also in the same category. Lim landed 12th overall in the individual ranking of the WSCToC.

“The idea behind the World Scholar’s Cup was to create something different than traditional academic competitions and conferences: a celebration of the joy of learning, a tournament as rewarding for the team that came in last as the for the team that came in first,” its website said.

The World Scholar’s Cup is “inclusive, encouraging, interdisciplinary, discussion-based, forward-looking, team-oriented, (and) whimsical,” and it aims “to motivate students of all backgrounds to discover new strengths and practice new skills,” and “to inspire a global community of future scholars and leaders.”

“It was overwhelming to be among other scholars from various countries, but we did not let that dishearten us,” Tiongson said. “The team is indeed delighted, grateful, and proud that we were not only able to bring honor and pride to our families but also to our school and country.”

Her team’s coach, Amity Yap, noted that this was the highest ranking the school had ever achieved since participating in the event six times.

“It’s important to note that WSC does not measure 100 percent academic knowledge, but the attitude, dedication, and independence of its scholars when given topics that are not exactly taught in schools. These three qualities cannot be taught, but are acquired by the students. To win in WSC is to reflect how holistic the learners are,” she said.

This year’s theme is “Unlikely World”, which guides the students on the coverage of the events’ topics, which they read and research on their own, according to a press release.

The subjects are Science and Technology (“To Shoot for the Moon”), History (“History of Conspiracy”), Literature (“Voices of the Almost Impossible”), Art and Music (“Fragments of an Improbable Universe”), Social Studies (“Predicting the Future”), and Modern Mythologies.

These high school students from Miriam College competed against 300 teams from all over the globe.


IMAGE Facebook.com/World Scholars Cup (left); Courtesy of Miriam College (right)

It took attitude, dedication, and independence for 16 all-female students to take home the glory from the World Scholar's Cup (WSC), says Amity Yap, one of the coaches of the Middle School and High School students from Miriam College who competed in the international event. A total of 2,200 scholars from 50 countries all over the world competed at the event, which was held this year at Yale University in the U.S. last November 10 to 14.

The team of high school students Mary Katherine DJ San Miguel, Aleeza Moira Tiongson, and Alyssa Santana ranked 9th in the final rounds of the WSC Tournament of Champions where there were 300 senior division teams. They earned a total of 29 gold medals, 21 silver medals, and three trophies. They were declared top 1 in Southeast Asia after competing in team debate, collaborative writing, and group quiz bee, among others.


IMAGE The Miriam College senior division team (from left) Aleeza Moira Tiongson, Mary Katherine DJ San Miguel, and Alyssa Santana


“It was overwhelming to be among other scholars from various countries, but we did not let that dishearten us,” said Tiongson. “The team is indeed delighted, grateful, and proud that we were not only able to bring honor and pride to our families but also to our school and country.”

The junior division team, composed of 13 middle school students, age 14 and below, also experienced their share of victory. Students Jiana Lim and Katrina Asedillo won 2nd and 7th place, respectively, for the literature category. Lim also grabbed 12th spot in the overall individual ranking among almost 1,200 competing scholars.

Overall, the junior division team took home 22 individual gold medals, 23 individual silver medals, nine team silver medals, and six team gold medals.

IMAGE All 16 World Scholar's Cup participants with Miriam College President Dr. Rosario O. Lapus


The World Scholar's Cup sets itself apart from other competitions for placing value not just in textbook knowledge, but also in the joy of learning. The tournament tests students in science, literature, history and social studies but also in topics like modern mythology. To prepare for the competition, the students had the theme as guide, "The Unlikely World."

“WSC does not measure 100% academic knowledge but the attitude, dedication, and independence of its scholars when given topics that are not exactly taught in schools. These three qualities cannot be taught, but are acquired by the students – to win in WSC is to reflect how holistic the learners are,” said coach Yap.

Aside from team and individual events, community-building activities also take place at WSC, according to the event’s website. They hold talent shows where skills range from dancing to reciting math constants, student fairs where participants get to share their culture and traditions with fellow participants, and opportunities to attend talks by guest speakers from leading universities.

Nine other schools from the Philippines also competed at WSC, with Immaculate Conception Academy making it to 10th place in the senior division.




SOURCE: http://www.smartparenting.com.ph/life/news/this-is-what-it-takes-to-win-at-a-worldwide-tournament-says-coach-a00026-20171121?utm_source=Facebook-SP&utm_medium=Ownshare&utm_campaign=20171121-fbnp-life-says-coach-fbfirst

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